A Netflix show accidentally showed Mukesh Ambani’s private garage

·3-min read

He’s India’s richest man, who lives in a skyscraper in the heart of India’s most expensive piece of real estate. Mukesh Ambani’s 4,00,000 square feet home in Mumbai’s tony Altamount Road is one of the most iconic buildings in the city. Antilia, named after the mythical island in the Atlantic Ocean, has been Ambani’s home since 2012. The 27-storied structure is a state-of-the art building with features that you likely cannot even imagine. There are three helipads, an air traffic control booth, a ballroom, nine high-speed elevators, a 50-seat theatre, multiple terrace gardens, a spa and a health centre as well as a swimming pool, temple and, get this, a room where snowflakes literally fall from the ceiling. Even though it is 27 stories high, only the top six floors serve as private residences to the Ambani family. Reportedly valued at $1.2 billion, Mukesh Ambani’s home is said to be the second most valuable residential property after the Buckingham Palace.

Even though each floor is more spectacular than the previous one, it’s safe to say that the most fascinating one is likely the one that holds all of the Ambani family’s cars. According to various reports, an entire floor has been reserved for Mukesh Ambani’s cars. The garage can reportedly hold up to 168 cars.

Given that the garage belongs to India’s richest man (and after the fall of Jack Ma, Asia’s richest man) it’s easy to imagine that the cars parked there would be some of the best, the rarest, and the most exotic ones.

Every once in a while, you get a glimpse of what cars Mukesh Ambani owns when he steps out of his home and an entourage of cars are ahead of and behind his own. However, never before has anyone managed to get a glimpse of all (or at least some of the most expensive) cars that Mukesh Ambani owns.

Until now.

Netflix’s mini-series Cricket Fever: Mumbai Indians followed the IPL team throughout their tournament. The show itself may have been a treat for the fans of the team but some hawk-eyed viewers were quick to catch a glimpse of Mukesh Ambani’s garage and some of the cars that he owns.

The part comes when the Mumbai Indians team members visit Antilia and some of them set out on a treasure hunt as part of a team-building exercise. Their search leads them to the garage and the 13-second clip reveals what could well be the real treasure: the supercars in Mukesh Ambani’s garage.

What cars does Mukesh Ambani drive?

A quick peek into Mukesh Ambani’s garage, courtesy Netflix’s Cricket Fever: Mumbai Indians reveals that the billionaire has a Land Rover, a Porsche Cayenne, a Bentley Mulsanne and a Rolls Royce Phantom Drophead Coupe among others. He also owns a Bentley Bentayga, Mercedes-AMG G63, and a relatively humble Mercedes-Benz E-Class.

Then there was, of course, the Matte Black BMW i8 that received special footage with the players drooling all over it under the pretext of hunting for treasure hunt clues. The BMW i8 is a hybrid coupé that goes from zero to 100 kph in 4.4 seconds and has an electronically limited top speed of 250 kph.

Besides the machines you’d have seen in the garage, Mukesh Ambani is also said to own a Tesla Model S, Bentley Bentayga V8 and Bentley Bentayga W12, a Rolls Royce Cullinan, a Mercedes-AMG G63, and a Lamborghini Urus. All of Mukesh Ambani’s cars are said to be armoured machines to ensure that the billionaire passenger is as safe as he is comfortable. Some of these vehicles are said to be able to withstand a 15 kg TNT blast.

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