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The British army just sparked even more confusion about Kate Middleton's absence

Kate Middleton wears a green coatdress and green hat as she rides in a carriage during the Trooping the Colour parade.
Kate Middleton during the Trooping the Colour parade in June last year. Karwai Tang/WireImage
  • The British army removed a statement that said Kate Middleton would attend the king's birthday in June.

  • A source close to the situation said the army didn't have permission from Kate's team.

  • The palace previously said Kate would return to duties in Easter after having abdominal surgery.

The British army has just sparked even more confusion about Kate Middleton's absence from the public eye.

Multiple outlets, including BBC News and The Guardian, reported on Tuesday that the army had released tickets for one of its annual Trooping the Colour events featuring the Princess of Wales on June 8.

But it's understood that references to Kate were swiftly deleted after Kensington Palace said it hadn't confirmed her appearance.

It's thought that Kate's appearance was previously announced because of her role as colonel of the Irish Guards, which are set to participate in this year's event. But a source close to the situation told Business Insider the army didn't seek the palace's approval before confirming the princess' attendance.

Representatives for Kensington Palace didn't immediately respond to requests for comment from BI.

Prince Charles and Queen Elizabeth II at Trooping the Colour in June 2022.
Prince Charles and Queen Elizabeth II at Trooping the Colour in June 2022.DANIEL LEAL/AFP via Getty Images

Trooping the Colour dates back to the 17th century and consists of a handful of events held in June every year in honor of the monarch's official birthday.

The main event — also referred to as the king's birthday parade — is scheduled to take place on June 15 and is set to feature 1,350 soldiers from the Household Division and the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery. There will also be more than 300 musicians, according to the event page on the British army's website.

It's not known whether the king, who's being treated for cancer, will attend the event. BBC News reported that the palace would confirm details nearer the time.

Members of the royal family usually take part in the parade before descending upon the Buckingham Palace balcony to watch a military flypast and to wave at the crowds.

The king and queen on the Buckingham Palace balcony with their Pages of Honour.
The king and queen on the Buckingham Palace balcony with their Pages of Honour.MARCO BERTORELLO/AFP via Getty Images

The army initially scheduled Kate to attend The Colonel's Review on June 8, which is described on the event page as "identical to The King's Birthday Parade, with the exception that some additional mounted officers ride on the latter."

Speculation around Kate's absence, and the royal family's apparent refusal to address the rumors, have left many wondering whether the British monarchy is in crisis.

The announcement and swift retraction are likely to add to these concerns.

The palace previously said Kate probably wouldn't return to royal duties until Easter following abdominal surgery in January.

Chris Ship, ITV News' royal editor, shared a link to the original event listing on X on Tuesday before it was removed. He wrote that it caused "confusion about if and when Kate will return to work."

"But after about 12 hours the @BritishArmy is be about to take down this page about Trooping the Colour. Admitting they didn't check with Kensington Palace first," Ship wrote.

Kate was photographed in a car with her mom, Carole Middleton, on Monday, marking her first public appearance since Christmas Day.

In a statement sent to BI on February 29, Kensington Palace said Kate was "doing well."

"We gave guidance two days ago that The Princess of Wales continues to be doing well," the statement said. "As we have been clear since our initial statement in January, we shall not be providing a running commentary or providing daily updates."

Read the original article on Business Insider