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Couple Featured in Netflix's 'American Nightmare' Doesn't Know Why They Were Targeted: 'Sticking Point to Recovery' (Exclusive)

Denise Huskins and Aaron Quinn recently opened up to PEOPLE about the 2015 kidnapping that inspired Netflix's latest true crime series

<p>Courtesy of Netflix</p> Denise Huskins and Aaron Quinn

Courtesy of Netflix

Denise Huskins and Aaron Quinn

• Police initially didn't believe the accounts of Denise Huskins and her then-boyfriend, Aaron Quinn, and their ordeal is the subject of Netflix's new docuseries, American Nightmare

• A chance discovery at a similar crime scene 40 miles away from the couple's Vallejo home led to the arrest of the suspect, Matthew Muller

• The couple told PEOPLE recently they still don't know why they were targeted: "Like many victims, or many people who have gone through tragedy, you don't get all the answers," Quinn said

For months after Denise Huskins was kidnapped and suddenly reappeared at her family’s California home, local police publicly suggested she and boyfriend Aaron Quinn had orchestrated the whole thing.

The Solano County couple received a modicum of justice when authorities finally cracked the case, bringing to an end the public shaming the couple faced after police in Vallejo, Calif., claimed they were lying about the incident.

A chance discovery at a similar crime scene 40 miles away connected Matthew Muller, a former Marine and disbarred Harvard-educated immigration attorney, to their case. Muller was arrested and later pleaded guilty to one count of federal kidnapping in 2016.

But to this day one question still remains: Why did he target the couple?

That’s something Quinn says he and Huskins can’t worry about any longer, the couple told PEOPLE during a recent interview ahead of the release of American Nightmare, the true crime Netflix series about their story.

Related: Woman Falsely Accused of Hoax in American Nightmare Recalls Trauma After Public Doubt Over Kidnapping (Exclusive)

<p>Courtesy of Netflix</p>

Courtesy of Netflix

In the interview, Quinn said he and Huskins have tried to move forward with their lives, despite lacking an answer to one of their biggest questions over the years.

"Like many victims, or many people who have gone through tragedy, you don't get all the answers,” Quinn said. "And that can be a sticking point to recovery. So for us, we don't rely on finding those answers, but what we have to do is move forward in the unknown and focus on things that matter the most to us, like our family, our kids, our work. Those are sustainable things. And having the answers of why they targeted us doesn't change what we do as far as moving forward.”

<p>Mike Jory/The Times-Herald via AP</p> Denise Huskins and Aaron Quinn

Mike Jory/The Times-Herald via AP

Denise Huskins and Aaron Quinn

Muller, now 44, was also charged at the state level with one charge for kidnapping, two counts of rape, as well as robbery and burglary charges. However, he was later found mentally incompetent to stand trial, leaving Huskins and Quinn with lingering questions about why they were targeted.

Related: 'Gone Girl' Kidnapping: 5 Things to Know About the Case's Bizarre Twists and Turns

The case baffled authorities for months, as they refused to believe the couple.

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Quinn told investigators that a group of intruders wearing scuba gear had entered their home in the middle of the night armed with taser guns. He told police how the intruders bound him and Huskins with zip ties inside a closet in their home, blindfolding them with blackout goggles before kidnapping Huskins and demanding an $8,500 ransom.

Two days later, Huskins was found near her mother’s home after she was released from the kidnapping.

<p>Courtesy of Netflix</p> Denise Huskins and Aaron Quinn

Courtesy of Netflix

Denise Huskins and Aaron Quinn

Huskins and Quinn would go on to sue the City of Vallejo for defamation, claiming that instead of helping them find the kidnapper, Vallejo police instead “destroyed their reputations through an outrageous, completely unprofessional, and wholly unfounded claim of disparagement.”

The couple would eventually win a $2.5 million settlement in 2018.

If you or someone you know has been sexually assaulted, please contact the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-656-HOPE (4673) or go to rainn.org.

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Read the original article on People.