Gerard Butler's new movie Greenland gets certified Fresh on Rotten Tomatoes

Tasha Hegarty
·4-min read
Photo credit: YouTube
Photo credit: YouTube

From Digital Spy

Gerard Butler's end of the world disaster movie, Greenland has been certified Fresh on Rotten Tomatoes with a fairly respectable 77% Fresh rating.

The film's summer premiere dates were originally interrupted by the global pandemic, resulting in it skipping cinemas entirely and heading straight for on-demand streaming.

For those who love nothing more than binging on disaster movies, this is definitely one to add to the list, with Butler playing a dad who is trying to repair his relationship with his wife (Deadpool's Morena Baccarin) and their son Nathan (The Walking Dead: World Beyond's Roger Dale Floyd).

Photo credit: STX Entertainment - YouTube
Photo credit: STX Entertainment - YouTube

Plans for reconciliation are abandoned when a comet due to pass by Earth actually makes impact and it is a race against time to get the family to a safety bunker before it destroys humanity.

The film also stars Marvel's Scott Glenn from Daredevil, Outcast's David Denman, Captain America: Civil War's Hope Davis, To All The Boys I've Loved Before's Andrew Bachelor, and The Walking Dead's Joshua Mikel.

Here's what the critics had to say about the newest disaster movie:

Deadline

"The usual beats of any disaster flick can be found here, but the execution and emphasis is quite different as Greenland establishes a strong emotional core enveloped in the importance of family ties.

"That is the motivating factor here for Butler's character and his desperate plight. The focus on this familial unit is what keeps Greenland from going off the rails, even as some of the roadside encounters veer close to cliché."

Photo credit: STX Entertainment - YouTube
Photo credit: STX Entertainment - YouTube

Flickering Myth

"For as much as I felt like I was watching an uncovered gem from the 90s, Greenland is also a movie befitting of its time that utilises a pandemic dynamic tastefully unlike a certain piece of garbage that was released last week.

"There's also the added bonus that the action is quite literally nonstop once it gets going. Who knew what we could have used all this time was a brainless Gerard Butler flick; it has more heart and substance than you might be led to believe."

The Wrap

"Butler's less-than-dynamic screen presence is put to good use here; as opposed to the Has Fallen movies, where he's the world's greatest Secret Service agent, here he's just a dad trying to look out for his family under extreme circumstances. (A dad who can throw a punch, granted, but a dad all the same.)

"He and Baccarin play the tension of their relationship well, and it certainly helps that they encounter a talented cross-section of character actors, including Hope Davis, David Denman, Andrew Bachelor and, as Allison's father, the indefatigable Scott Glenn."

Photo credit: YouTube
Photo credit: YouTube

The Guardian

"The tight focus on a family's struggle to stay alive rather than the experts figuring out what to do behind the scenes is refreshing (Butler's everyman can only do so much to help) and there's a horribly well-orchestrated anxiety to some of the earlier, surprisingly believable scenes.

"The specifics of selection and how this process would then operate during a disaster (starting with the newly adopted presidential alert which leads to a QR code) feels just about convincing enough and there's a clamminess to watching the characters desperately try to figure it all out.

"The script, from Buried writer Chris Sparling, is also infused with a rather pessimistic view of humanity, characters showcasing terrible behaviour that's easily identifiable after the year we have all had."

The Hollywood Reporter

"Like a Roland Emmerich movie made with less money, bombast and in-your-face patriotism, Greenland is a darker and more ground-level experience, only really going big when it needs to (and can afford it).

"If anything, it feels closer to a film like World War Z than to giant-rocks-destroying-the-planet flicks like Armageddon or Deep Impact (the latter, directed by Mimi Leder, still holds up rather well), with set-pieces that play as unnervingly real no matter how improbable they may be."

Greenland will air on Premium Video On-Demand in the US before Christmas and the UK will see it on Amazon Prime Video at a later date.

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