Mel Gibson: Batman V Superman Was 'A Piece Of S**t'

Ben Arnold
UK Movies Writer

As we all know, Mel Gibson isn’t one to mince his words.

And now, he’s taken aim at the bloated, post-$200 million blockbuster culture of Hollywood, and one movie in particular.

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Gibson was speaking with Deadline about the relatively small budget he managed to bring his new World War II movie ‘Hacksaw Ridge’ in at.

Making the film in Australia, with mostly Australian crew and with a good exchange rate, he says that he took a ‘$27 million budget and turned it into a $40 million budget’.

However, he’s baffled at how movies are made for nearly $200 million and still make a profit (there’s a growing school of thought which says that many are not).

And that’s when Zack Snyder’s much-maligned, $250 million budget ‘Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice’ got both barrels.

“I look at them and scratch my head. I’m really baffled by it,” he said.

“I think there’s a lot of waste, but maybe if I did one of those things with the green screens I’d find out different.

“It seems to me that you could do it for less… You’re spending outrageous amounts of money, $180 million or more, I don’t know how you make it back after the tax man gets you, and after you give half to the exhibitors. What did they spend on ‘Batman v Superman’ that they’re admitting to?

“And it’s a piece of sh*t. I’m not interested in the stuff. Do you know what the difference between real superheroes and comic book superheroes is? Real superheroes didn’t wear spandex.

“So I don’t know. Spandex must cost a lot.”

Some critics are saying that ‘Hacksaw Ridge’ could signal Gibson’s return to Hollywood after many years in the wilderness.

Gibson’s behaviour – not to mention anti-semitic rants at policemen – made him persona non grata in the movie business for several years.

However, ‘Hacksaw Ridge’, which stars Andrew Garfield and Vince Vaughn, received a 10-minute standing ovation on its premiere at the Venice Film Festival this week.

Critics have showered it with praise, and it currently sits pretty with a 91% approval rating on reviews aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes.

It tells the true story of army medic and conscientious objector Desmond T. Doss, who joined the war effort but refused to bear arms.

He was awarded the Medal of Honor by President Harry S. Truman for his valour in the Battle of Okinawa.

It’s due out in the UK on November.

Image credits: AP/Warner Bros/Summit Entertainment/Deadline