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Nước Chấm, The Vietnamese Dipping Sauce, Has A Very Literal Name

Nước chấm in bowl
Nước chấm in bowl - AS Foodstudio/Shutterstock

Vietnamese cuisine is among the world's most delicious and distinctive foods, from comforting bowls of pho to mouthwatering banh mi. If you've ever enjoyed some tasty Vietnamese spring rolls, you've likely encountered nước chấm, a vibrant blend of ingredients with a name as interesting as its flavor profile.

The name for this dipping sauce literally translates to "dipping sauce." Nước chấm is such an ever-present part of Vietnamese culture that there was simply no need for any other name. Fellow cooks and diners often immediately understand the reference to the simple condiment. It's based on a mixture of fish sauce with rice vinegar or lime juice (or both) that's sweetened and infused with potent flavor from minced garlic, sliced chiles, or other add-ins.

Don't let the name fool you, though. Nước chấm isn't just for dipping. It's also commonly used as a dressing for noodles and salads, to season rice bowls or as a flavor booster for grilled meat or fish. Chefs also integrate it into any fusion cuisine that needs a hint of lighter Vietnamese flair.

Read more: 41 Must Try Hot Sandwich Recipes

A Handy Sauce For All Sorts Of Vietnamese Cooking

Spring rolls on plate
Spring rolls on plate - Nagritsamon Ruksujjar/Shutterstock

Nước chấm is also easy to make ahead of time and have ready to go when you need to amp up flavors in any dish. It'll stay fresh all day at room temperature, freeing up space in the fridge. When prepared without lime juice or vinegar, it can last up to two weeks in the refrigerator. Just add these acids as needed when making sauce from the base.

This condiment can also vary, sometimes significantly, based on one of its key ingredients; fish sauce. While all varieties are based on fermented fish and salt, the varying types of fish, fermentation time and conditions, and other ingredients or additives can make a big difference from one brand to the next. Cooks passionate about Vietnamese and other Southeast Asian cuisines may want to try a few to find their desired flavor profile.

Hungry yet? Try some nước chấm the next time you're chowing down on any must-have Vietnamese dishes.

Read the original article on Mashed.