• Sky News

    Ursula von der Leyen issues Brexit message after being elected to replace Jean-Claude Juncker

    The new president of the European Commission issued an instant Brexit message after being elected to replace Jean-Claude Juncker - warning that both Britain and the EU "should do everything not to have a hard Brexit". Ursula von der Leyen, who is the first woman to take on the role, also said she would be willing to allow another Brexit extension beyond 31 October. "And secondly it is very difficult to have Brexit.

  • Countdown's Rachel Riley and Strictly's Pacha Kovalev's share intimate honeymoon pictures
    Yahoo Celebrity UK

    Countdown's Rachel Riley and Strictly's Pacha Kovalev's share intimate honeymoon pictures

    The couple - who are expecting their first child - are on honeymoon in Europe.

  • The Telegraph

    Investigators 'discover mysterious 200lb load' on board MH370 after take-off

    Investigators looking into the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 have discovered a “mysterious 200lb load” added to the flight list after take-off, according to an engineer whose wife and two children were on board.

  • Piers Morgan and Rochelle Humes among stars in FaceApp challenge
    AOL.com

    Piers Morgan and Rochelle Humes among stars in FaceApp challenge

    Piers Morgan and Rochelle Humes are among the many stars to take part in an old-age FaceApp challenge.Shortly after announcing that he and co-host Susanna Reid will be taking a long break from Good Morning Britain, Morgan took to Twitter to share an image of his wrinkled face.FaceApp allows users to have a terrifying peek into the future, using camera filters to drastically age the person in the image.Alongside the selfie of his wrinkled face and grey hair, Morgan wrote: "I need a break." I need a break. pic.twitter.com/9smWrMmBBv \- Piers Morgan (@piersmorgan) July 16, 2019The post fitting came just a couple of hours after he announced that he and Reid will be taking lengthy break from GMB, not returning to the ITV morning show until September 2."UPDATE: Tomorrow is our last day on @GMB until September 2," he wrote. "So @susannareid100 & I intend to make it a memorable one... and to help us, we have the brilliant @benstokes38 live in the studio for his first big TV interview since winning the World Cup You won't want to miss this."Elsewhere, Rochelle Humes also took part in the FaceApp challenge, tagging celebrity beauty specialist Shane Cooper as she stressed over her future wrinkles."I'm so scared. @shanecooperuk I need an appointment yesterday," she captioned an Instagram post.Her husband Marvin also joined the viral challenge, writing: "Roch and her Sugar Daddy," alongside an image of him with a bald head and grey beard.Various other celebrities have been playing around with the ageing app, including Gordon Ramsay, who shared an image from one of his cooking series and joked he was "hosting MasterChef season 50". Me hosting MasterChef Season 50......faceapppic.twitter.com/uKnfxUpC1D \- Gordon Ramsay (@GordonRamsay) July 16, 2019 View this post on Instagram A post shared by jade amelia thirlwall (@jadethirlwall) on Jul 16, 2019 at 1:20pm PDTLittle Mix's Jade Thirlwall also got involved, although she was fairly satisfied with the results, writing: "I'm not even mad tho."\- This article first appeared on YahooRead more: Piers Morgan urges Gary Lineker to challenge BBC salary increases​​​​​Read more: 'Stay away from my wife': Piers Morgan 'furious' Richard Arnold has been texting his wife behind his back

  • Snow Patrol ballad Chasing Cars named most-played song of the 21st Century
    PA Ready News UK

    Snow Patrol ballad Chasing Cars named most-played song of the 21st Century

    Gary Lightbody has previously said the track is 'the purest love song' he has ever written.

  • Little Boy Has Priceless Reaction to Dad’s Military Homecoming
    Storyful

    Little Boy Has Priceless Reaction to Dad’s Military Homecoming

    Kristen recorded the hilarious moment her husband Dave was reunited with their children, Emma and Owen, in Sacramento, California.The video shows little Emma and Owen running towards their father, Emma runs straight to him, but before two-year-old Owen reaches his dad, he gets distracted and ignores him.Kristen told Storyful Dave was returning home from a six month tour of duty. Emma teared up after seeing him, but Owen saw some decorative statues behind his dad and wanted to see those instead of giving him a hug.Dave was home for 30-days before returning to a tour of duty overseas. Credit: Kristen via Storyful

  • Julian Assange received deliveries and maintained control over guest list while at Ecuadorian embassy, documents reveal
    The Independent

    Julian Assange received deliveries and maintained control over guest list while at Ecuadorian embassy, documents reveal

    WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange maintained an unusual amount of power during his stay at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, new documents reveal. Assange, who was arrested in London in April, took refuge in Ecuador’s embassy in 2012 to avoid extradition to Sweden over sexual assault allegations.He stayed there for nearly seven years, while views surrounding his role in the 2016 US election, during which Wikileaks published emails from the Democrats and appeared to sway influence in Donald Trump’s favour, have become contentious.According to surveillance reports seen by CNN, Assange received deliveries potentially containing hacked materials related to the 2016 US election during a series of “suspicious meetings” at the embassy. Assange also had control over visitors. He created a list of people who were allowed to enter the embassy without showing identification or being searched by security, and was granted the power to delete names from visitor logs. He sometimes met guests inside a woman’s bathroom to avoid security cameras.The report also says that he was given “powerful new computing and network hardware” just a few weeks before WikiLeaks received hacked materials from Russian operatives. He apparently met with “Russians and world-class hackers” at the embassy at “critical moments” as well. Andrew Müller-Maguhn, the German hacker named in Mr Mueller’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 election, also makes a prominent appearance in the surveillance documents, visiting Assange at the London embassy at least a dozen times before the 2016 election.These surveillance reports were compiled by for the Ecuadorian government by UC Global, a private Spanish security company. An Ecuadorian intelligence official confirmed to CNN that the surveillance reports are authentic.

  • Elon Musk hopes to put brain-reading implant in human by 2020
    PA Science

    Elon Musk hopes to put brain-reading implant in human by 2020

    The entrepreneur's Neuralink startup has already tested the technology on a monkey which was able to control a computer, Mr Musk revealed.

  • Game Of Thrones and Marvel Studios the main attractions as Comic-Con returns
    PA Entertainment

    Game Of Thrones and Marvel Studios the main attractions as Comic-Con returns

    The annual pop culture convention takes place in San Diego.

  • Meteor showers to watch out for in 2019, including the Perseids
    The Telegraph

    Meteor showers to watch out for in 2019, including the Perseids

    Get your telescopes and cameras ready as space fans are in for another celestial treat this July and August. The Perseids, one of the brightest meteor showers of the year, is set to grace our skies, with the chance to see up to 50-100 meteors per hour.

  • Dame Helen Mirren: End of universal TV licence for over-75s is heartbreaking
    PA Ready News UK

    Dame Helen Mirren: End of universal TV licence for over-75s is heartbreaking

    Stars Sir Lenny Henry and Amanda Redman have also signed an open letter to the next PM, urging the Government to reconsider.

  • UK enjoys partial lunar eclipse on 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 moon mission launch
    The Telegraph

    UK enjoys partial lunar eclipse on 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 moon mission launch

    Stargazers have been treated to a cosmic spectacle as a partial lunar eclipse was visible across parts of the UK. The event on Tuesday evening coincided with the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 launching its moon mission.

  • UK doing more than any other country to end scourge of modern slavery
    The Telegraph

    UK doing more than any other country to end scourge of modern slavery

    Britain is doing more than any other country to combat modern slavery and human trafficking, but progress to eradicate these practices across the globe remains “disgracefully marginal”, a major report has warned.

  • Gun megastore plan in New Zealand's Christchurch sparks backlash - media
    Reuters

    Gun megastore plan in New Zealand's Christchurch sparks backlash - media

    New Zealand retailer Gun City, which sold weapons to the man accused of shootings at two Christchurch mosques that killed 51 people and injured dozens, has aroused concern with plans for a mega store in the South Island city, media said on Wednesday. Radio New Zealand said some of those living near the proposed site were upset at the prospect of the store, sprawling over 300 sq m (3,229 sq ft), along with warehouse, office and carpark, set to open in August. Gun City did not immediately reply to Reuters' request for comment.

  • Jeremy Corbyn fails test of leadership, say Labour peers in newspaper ad
    PA Ready News UK

    Jeremy Corbyn fails test of leadership, say Labour peers in newspaper ad

    The advert, which was supported by 67 Labour peers, says Mr Corbyn is accountable 'for allowing anti-Semitism to grow in our party'.

  • Domestic violence victims in rural areas are being let down, report claims
    PA Ready News UK

    Domestic violence victims in rural areas are being let down, report claims

    A new report says it is more difficult to access support services in the countryside.

  • Dunedin rolls with it after losing world's steepest street title
    The Guardian

    Dunedin rolls with it after losing world's steepest street title

    Mayor of New Zealand city says a tweak to signage might be all that’s needed, while some living on Baldwin Street are relieved. The New Zealand city of Dunedin has sought to look on the bright side after losing its claim to have the world’s steepest street to a town in Wales, with its mayor saying: “The street certainly hasn’t got any less steep as a result of the decision.” This week, Guinness World Records officially stripped Dunedin’s Baldwin Street of the title and instead awarded it to Harlech in Wales. Its street, Ffordd Pen Llech, has a gradient of 37.45% at its steepest point – 2.5% steeper than Baldwin Street. Mayor Dave Cull took the blow on the chin, saying “Dunedin has a wonderful range of visitor attractions and we think plenty of people will still visit Baldwin Street as part of their Dunedin experience.” He suggested changing the street’s signage from “world’s steepest street” to “southern hemisphere’s steepest street”, something the council is taking advice on. Baldwin Street has long been a drawcard for tourists and daredevils alike. It has played host to brave drift triking, pogoers, electric scooter riders and rubbish bin rollers. Residents of the street do not seem to be fazed about their loss of status, and some have even welcomed the decision. “[Tourists] can be a bit unruly at times,” Ray Short, who has lived on the street for 53 years, told the Otago Daily Times. “They’ll walk right up to your garage and they’ll walk right up to your windows and take photos. It can all be a bit unnerving at times.’’ The street’s title was initially flagged in 1985 when a Dunedin journalist asked the council what the city’s steepest street was. A story was then broadcast that evening announcing the news to the world and so began a two-year correspondence with Guinness to get Baldwin Street officially recognised. That journalist, now national broadcaster Jim Mora, has said that he was disappointed by the latest decision but would still be “sporting” about it.

  • Women need to learn to say ‘what’s best for the family isn’t necessarily best for me’
    The Guardian

    Women need to learn to say ‘what’s best for the family isn’t necessarily best for me’

    Even in this era of dual-income households, women take the reins at home and men … carry on pretty much as they always did, with less sleep. It feels very personal, the fight you have with your partner about who does the laundry or cleans the bathroom. But the second-wave feminists were right. The personal is political. The unequal division of labour at home is a systemic issue that needs structural social change to solve it. Housework, writes Megan K Stack in her book Women’s Work, is “a ubiquitous physical demand that has hamstrung and silenced women for most of human history”. The battle for equality, she writes, starts at home. Like many heterosexual couples, it was the arrival of children that set my husband and me on divergent paths at home. I’ve been an avowed (and untidy) feminist since I was old enough to say the word. We were together for 10 years before the birth of our daughter – he knew his co-parent had zero aspirations to be a homemaker. So how did we end up so easily slipping into the prescribed gender roles that we’d dodged up until then? There are a few reasons that come to mind, such as structural issues like the lack of parental leave for fathers and the gender pay gap. And then there’s social conditioning. It’s difficult to swim against the tide. Becoming a parent is already a huge transition. Your identity is reforged in the crucible of sleep deprivation and newfound responsibility. The pre-kid lifestyle of Friday night drinks, free time and sleeping in becomes a distant memory. In this period of chaotic readjustment, it’s easy to fall back on what we know. Even in this era of dual-income households, women take the reins at home and men … carry on pretty much as they always did, with less sleep. Who can blame them? When you have someone to take care of menial stuff such as running your life, there’s little incentive to change the status quo. It’s nice having someone wash your clothes and cook your food. When you don’t have to expend mental energy keeping track of grocery lists and family birthdays, you have the cognitive bandwidth to think about other things. But the tired and outdated breadwinner model is just as limiting for men as it is for women. The pressure men feel to provide for their families means they work long hours and miss out on time with their children in the name of economic security. Women meanwhile become less independent and less employable because of time out of the workforce or a slower career progression as they spend an outsized proportion of their time performing unpaid (and undervalued) work outside the home. A report by Deloitte put the value of unpaid work in Victoria at $205bn, half the gross state product, while PwC research from 2017 found that women performed 72% of unpaid work in Australia. Some women don’t want to work outside the home – and that’s fine. But others do, and for them pursuing a career can be an uphill battle as they try to manage paid and unpaid work. If women want their partners to do more domestic tasks – which would free them up to do more work outside the home – it’s not going to happen without some uncomfortable conversations. Change is difficult. We’re asking someone to give up their privilege, a sticking point articulated by pioneering New Zealand economist Marilyn Waring in her 1988 book Counting for Nothing: What Men Value and What Women Are Worth. “Men won’t easily give up a system in which half the world’s population works for next to nothing,” she wrote. For many women, this is a hard conversation to initiate. It requires saying, “my needs are important too, and what’s best for the family isn’t necessarily best for me” – something that goes against how we expect women to behave. My eldest daughter is now six, and while my husband does a great deal around the house, I have never returned to working full-time. His career has forged ahead (to our collective benefit) while mine has adapted to the demands of childcare. ABC series The Letdown illustrates how difficult it is to defy this trend. Dual-income modern couples can take it in turns to focus on their careers, contend the main characters, Audrey and Jeremy. It’s not a convincing argument. “The woman’s turn usually involves primary caregiving and working full-time and sacrificing social life and sanity,” says their childless friend sceptically. If we want women to flourish, we need to make some concessions. But the result – men and women better fulfilling their potential inside and outside the home – is worth it. . Nicola Heath is a freelance writer

  • Brexit news latest: £3m spent on permits for driving abroad after UK leaves EU
    Evening Standard

    Brexit news latest: £3m spent on permits for driving abroad after UK leaves EU

    More than £3 million has been spent on permits which may be required to drive abroad after Brexit, Government figures show.Over the past five months, 584,000 International Driving Permits (IDPs) have been issued at a cost of £5.50 each. This means the total amount spent exceeds £3.2 million.Transport minister Michael Ellis revealed the figure in an answer to a written parliamentary question.The RAC described the demand as "truly astonishing" and urged the Government to ensure post offices are ready for a "sudden surge" ahead of the latest Brexit deadline of October 31.Driving licences issued by European Union states are valid for trips within the European Economic Area (EEA), which is the EU plus Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway.UK motorists may require IDPs to drive in the EEA in the event of a no-deal Brexit, leading many holidaymakers and business travellers to purchase the documents.IDPs were previously available from the AA and the RAC through the post, at the AA shop at the Eurotunnel terminal in Folkestone and at 89 Post Office branches. Collectively around 100,000 were issued each year.But since February, they have only been sold at about 2,500 Post Office branches.In March and April there were reports of long queues due to the high demand, with 282,000 and 163,000 applications respectively.A recent report by the House of Lords EU Internal Market Sub-Committee called for the permits to be made available online, saying it is "unsatisfactory" to require motorists to visit a post office.It added that the inconvenience and additional cost of the permits "should not be underestimated".RAC head of roads policy Nicholas Lyes said: "It's truly astonishing that more than half a million International Driving Permits have been issued since the Government took the service in-house."In one month alone, the number of IDPs issued was almost three times higher than the amount normally issued in an entire year."This shows that people who were planning to take their vehicles abroad most definitely heeded warnings about being ready to drive in the EU in the event of a no-deal Brexit. During the spring this led to long queues and even shortages of IDPs at some post offices."As we head towards the next Brexit deadline of 31 October 2019, it is vital that post offices are set up to cope with a sudden surge in IDP requests so that drivers are not confronted with frustrating pre-holiday delays."However, much of this will be dependent on the terms of the UK's departure from the EU."Additional reporting by PA

  • Toddler, 2, rushed to hospital after being bitten by bat as he slept in his cot
    Evening Standard

    Toddler, 2, rushed to hospital after being bitten by bat as he slept in his cot

    A British mother has been left terrified after her toddler was bitten by a bat as he lay sleeping in his cot.Two-year-old Kian Mallinson was rushed to hospital for a rabies jab after being attacked by the creature at his home in Hull.His mother Jodie Smith, 29, said she ran to check on her son after she was suddenly woken by his screams at 2am on Thursday.The former carer told the Sun she suspected it was a tummy ache until she saw three tiny marks on his arm the next morning.She then went into his room and was left “terrified” as she found a bat.Ms Smith told the newspaper: “As I made his bed I flicked the duvet up.“The bat flicked out and started crawling across his bedroom floor. I was terrified. I thought it was a tarantula at first.“I’ve never screamed so loudly.”The toddler was reportedly bitten by the UK’s most common bat: a pipistrelle.He is now recovering and is to have three more injections.

  • Class act: Thai teacher learns how to make English lessons fun
    Reuters

    Class act: Thai teacher learns how to make English lessons fun

    Thai English teacher Theeraphong Meesat has a unique way of boosting his students' confidence in class and making sure they loosen up - by wearing outrageous outfits and makeup. Theeraphong, 29, struts into his classroom at the Prasartratprachakit School in Ratchaburi province in a grey wig that resembles Lisa from the popular K-pop band Blackpink and eyelashes made from a feather duster.

  • Waterloo delays: Major disruption for commuters as person struck by train and 'passenger incident'
    Evening Standard

    Waterloo delays: Major disruption for commuters as person struck by train and 'passenger incident'

    Commuters have been facing travel chaos at London Waterloo with trains being cancelled by up to an hour.Rail passengers were warned the major disruption was likely to last all evening as a number of routes out of the capital were affected.Services came to a halt after a person was struck by a train between Surbiton and Basingstoke, South Western Railway (SWR) said.The severe disruption worsened due to a separate passenger incident at Brookwood, the rail firm said amid the chaos on Tuesday night. So this is the delay at waterloo station. Guess I won't be going home anytime soon pic.twitter.com/GdVbWtnaHy — suddaf chaudry (@suddafchaudry) July 16, 2019Commuters were still reporting problems at 10pm after the disruption began shortly before 7pm.London Waterloo, the UK’s busiest station, was among a number of stations affected by the disruption.Woking, Alton, Farnham, Salisbury, Gillingham, Portsmouth Harbour and Weybridge were also hit. Normal business resumed at Waterloo this evening delays chaos nobobyknows ⁦@dtg226⁩ pic.twitter.com/p43Pix9ovq — Mark Lacey (@MarkLacey7) July 16, 2019SWR said in a statement on its website: “Following reports of a person has being struck by a train between Surbiton and Basingstoke all lines have reopened.“Our response teams and emergency services have attended and trains are now able to travel through the area once again.“However, due to the level of disruption as well as a further passenger incident at Brookwood services are experiencing severe disruption.“Trains through this area may still be considerably delayed and alterations and cancellations are expected until the end of the day.”

  • Sky News

    'We stand ready': US air force warns against 'raid' on Area 51

    More than one million people who have signed up to raid Area 51 in the hope of seeing evidence of aliens have been warned that the US air force "stands ready to protect America and its assets". In a statement to The Washington Post, a spokeswoman said: "Area 51 is an open training range for the US air force, and we would discourage anyone from trying to come into the area where we train American armed forces. Huge secrecy surrounds Area 51, which is not open to the public and is under 24-hour surveillance.

  • New York introduces new law raising smoking age from 18 to 21
    Evening Standard

    New York introduces new law raising smoking age from 18 to 21

    New York is set to raise its smoking age from 18 to 21.The legislation was signed into law on Tuesday by the state's governor. The change, which takes effect in 120 days, will apply to the sales of traditional tobacco products as well as electronic cigarettes and vaporizers. Governor Andrew Cuomo said too many children and teens pick up smoking despite decades of efforts to snuff out the habit, in part because of marketing aimed at young people. "By raising the smoking age from 18 to 21, we can stop cigarettes and e-cigarettes from getting into the hands of young people in the first place and prevent an entire generation of New Yorkers from forming costly and potentially deadly addictions," he said in a statement announcing his signature. According to the American Cancer Society, 95 per cent of all smokers begin using tobacco before age 21. Raising the smoking age to 21 - a proposal the Society dubs "tobacco 21" - had been a major priority for the group in New York. "Tobacco 21 is a no-brainer," said Julie Hart, senior government relations director for the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network of New York. Sixteen states have approved raising the smoking age to 21, though in some the changes will not take effect until later in 2019 or in coming years. In addition, hundreds of local communities around the nation have made the move to 21.In New York state they include New York City, Long Island, Albany and a dozen other counties.

  • Neil Armstrong's Apollo 11 spacesuit unveiled at Smithsonian
    Reuters

    Neil Armstrong's Apollo 11 spacesuit unveiled at Smithsonian

    The spacesuit astronaut Neil Armstrong wore during his mission to the moon went on public display for the first time in 13 years on Tuesday, at the Smithsonian's Air and Space Museum exactly 50 years to the day when Apollo 11 launched into space. Armstrong's son Rick unveiled the suit along with U.S. Vice President Mike Pence who recalled how the country was deeply divided in the late 1960s but came together in pride when Armstrong became the first man to walk on the moon. "On top of the contributions to science and human understanding, for that brief moment, the man who wore this suit, brought together our nation and the world," Pence said.