• I'm A Celebrity 2019 line-up: The stars rumoured to be entering the jungle this year
    Evening Standard

    I'm A Celebrity 2019 line-up: The stars rumoured to be entering the jungle this year

    After Harry Redknapp won the nation's hearts in last year's edition of I'm A Celebrity, rumours are now circulating ahead of 2019's series.Speculation has been coming in thick and fast before the ITV show returns to our screens in November.

  • Police launch appeal after 'shockingly violent' attack on London Underground staff
    Yahoo News UK

    Police launch appeal after 'shockingly violent' attack on London Underground staff

    Police would like to identify two men and a woman after Transport for London (TfL) staff were attacked at West Ham Underground station in London on Thursday evening.

  • Boris Johnson has to deliver a Brexit deal. And now he may be on track to do it
    The Guardian

    Boris Johnson has to deliver a Brexit deal. And now he may be on track to do it

    He has no choice but to reach agreement with Brussels. But the DUP’s softening position could grant him a real political coup. The good ship Brexit surges forward, jagged rocks and whirlpools on all sides. Non-papers are on the table. The president of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, says: “We can have a deal.” The French and the Finns have given Boris Johnson until the end of the month to show “if his deal exists”. He wants to wait until after the Tory conference in two weeks, or even until the EU summit in four. What on earth is going on? I still believe Johnson is on track to pull off a coup. He has an obvious problem, but with an obvious solution. Earlier this year he promised to leave the EU by 31 October “ do or die … no ifs or buts”. This pledge was for no other purpose but to win the Tory leadership. It worked. Given his reputation as a liar, he really has no alternative but to deliver. Yet he needs help from Brussels. Otherwise he must endure the humiliation of a further Brexit delay. Enter problem number two. The only deal that enables the October deadline to be met is Theresa May’s deal that he himself supported last March. But it is – or was – anathema to much of his party and to Northern Ireland’s DUP, fused as the backbone of his support in the Commons. He cannot rely on Labour or the minority parties to back him should he revive May’s deal, especially given that they are now in the remain camp and think they have trapped him into further delay. So he needs his backwoodsmen onside, and they are still deferring to the DUP. Johnson is hamstrung by Northern Ireland. The curse of the “first” British empire is still alive and kicking. Johnson’s strategy is to drive the Northern Irish to the limit. That is why the important meeting this week was not in Brussels or Luxembourg. It was between Dublin’s Leo Varadkar and the DUP leader, Arlene Foster. For months Foster has been nonsensically demanding that the UK leave the customs union with no hard border in Ireland and no border down the Irish Sea. It recalls the satirical Paisleyite demand that Britain rejoin Northern Ireland to the Scottish landmass as in prehistory, and rechannel the Irish Sea through Armagh and Lough Erne. This was revived last week in Johnson’s madcap suggestion of a bridge. Foster has had a number of shocks recently. Her business community is appalled by the prospect of no deal and the loss of the EU single market. It could cost 40,000 jobs. The Police Service of Northern Ireland has warned that any hard border would be a “ direct threat” to its members. More alarming, polls have shown that Northern Irish opinion is not only in favour of remain, but narrow majorities are now in favour of a customs union with the south rather than with Britain, and even in favour of Irish reunification. The DUP may be on the brink of becoming history. Challenged in Dublin on Wednesday about her intransigence, Foster confessed to “flexibility”, a word almost unknown in Northern Irish politics. She accepted that Northern Ireland’s geography meant distinguishing the Northern Ireland backstop from a “Northern Ireland-only deal”, involving a possible “special economic zone” in Ireland. That a restored Stormont should be “consulted” on such a zone was accepted by Brussels. The DUP appears to have drawn back from demanding a veto. No one is calling it a backstop. On such terminological niceties the rock of diplomacy sometimes rests. It is now clear that Johnson’s lead negotiator, David Frost, has in his ring-file a form of words designed to offer long-term comfort to the EU and the Irish government. They are words that will be pressed on Foster and her colleagues – and on Tory backbenchers – as the deadlines approach. These words cannot be revealed to the EU or to parliament, since they can still frighten the horses. The EU is not yet the issue. Johnson can kiss and make up to the entire gang of 27, but that is no good if Churchill’s “ dreary steeples of Fermanagh and Tyrone” still stand immutable. This is politics in the raw. What now matters is timing. Johnson may have exasperated Brussels beyond endurance, but the EU must accept the crude realities of democracy – which it never does with good grace. I assume shrewder heads in the corridors of Brussels get the point. Deadlines are not for fun. They are part of the chemistry of politics. Johnson’s party conference is critical. He needs his ducks in a row. People forget that what is being sought here is not a Brexit “deal” but rather a hiatus in a deal – a two-year pause in which to reach a new trade settlement, soft or hard, with the EU. What is needed is a form of words, in effect between Belfast and Dublin, ensuring that, should Britain eventually and stupidly leave the single market, special arrangements for Northern Ireland are feasible. They need only be feasible. If so, grownup EU negotiators need not obsess about a fixed backstop. An equilibrium of compromise is in the interest of both sides. Johnson would have to dress up his deal as May-plus or May-minus, but that is for wordsmiths. His one need is to deliver formal Brexit on target. It would leave both Labour and the Liberal Democrats, now pledged to various forms of remain, up the electoral creek without a paddle. For Johnson it would be a real political coup, and set him up for an election. Of course I could be wrong. But the alternative is beyond mad. It would require Johnson’s entire no-deal antics, in parliament and beyond, to be no more than a ghastly Bullingdon Club prank – a nation imposing a huge economic sanction on itself for nothing but its leader’s warped vanity. I cannot believe the prime minister wants that for his epitaph. . Simon Jenkins is a Guardian columnist

  • Misha Nonoo wedding: Meghan Markle's best friend marries Michael Hess in Italy
    Evening Standard

    Misha Nonoo wedding: Meghan Markle's best friend marries Michael Hess in Italy

    Guests including Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are attending the wedding of fashion designer Misha Nonoo.The American-based designer - who reportedly first set up the Duke and Duchess of Sussex on a blind date - is marrying energy entrepreneur Michael Hess this weekend in an elaborate ceremony in Rome.

  • Driver who killed a father after ploughing into his car at 72mph in a 30mph zone should have been banned from driving
    Yahoo News UK

    Driver who killed a father after ploughing into his car at 72mph in a 30mph zone should have been banned from driving

    Ivan Girga, 27, was travelling at 72mph in a 30mph zone on Crescent Road in Crumpsall prior to the horror crash, which killed 42-year-old Ghusanfar Illyas.

  • Mayfair cleared of homeless 'tent city' amid fears of crime wave
    The Telegraph

    Mayfair cleared of homeless 'tent city' amid fears of crime wave

    On the Monopoly board, Mayfair is London’s most expensive property. Its streets are lined with grand townhouses, embassies and ambassadors’ residences standing shoulder-to-shoulder with some of Britain’s fanciest hotels and restaurants.

  • Megan Fox defends son's right to wear dresses 'no matter what anyone says'
    Yahoo Celebrity UK

    Megan Fox defends son's right to wear dresses 'no matter what anyone says'

    The actress was previously criticised for letting Noah wear dresses.

  • Catherine Tyldesley hails Strictly’s impact on her body image and ‘hang-ups’
    PA Media: Entertainment

    Catherine Tyldesley hails Strictly’s impact on her body image and ‘hang-ups’

    The former Corrie star has shed her concerns about how her body looks as she has started training for hours a day for the first live show.

  • Daimler ends petrol engine development to focus on electric cars
    motor1

    Daimler ends petrol engine development to focus on electric cars

    The future is electric and Daimler is ready to make the transition.

  • Jo Swinson calls out Emily Thornberry over Taliban comments
    Evening Standard

    Jo Swinson calls out Emily Thornberry over Taliban comments

    Jo Swinson has hit back at comments from Labour's Emily Thornberry after she said the Liberal Democrats have “gotten kind of Taliban” with their position on Brexit.Following the party's annual conference last weekend, the Lib Dems committed to revoke Article 50 if they make it into power and stop the Brexit process in its tracks.

  • Car review: Volvo XC90 (2020) – far too well-built for its own good
    The Independent

    Car review: Volvo XC90 (2020) – far too well-built for its own good

    Do you ever wonder what the fate of the nation’s vast fleet of four-wheel drive SUVs might be?I mean, over the past decade or more, hundreds of thousands of these well-engineered, if not over-engineered, vehicles have been purchased, and few have had their wheels muddied in all that time. The differential locks, the highly articulated suspension, the clever electronic hill descent control – all entirely unused, but lugged around needlessly to the detriment of fuel economy and emissions alike. Lugged around, too, by understressed big turbo-diesel engines ordinarily capable of mileages well into six figures.

  • United States announces military response and Iran sanctions after attacks on Saudi oil facilities
    The Telegraph

    United States announces military response and Iran sanctions after attacks on Saudi oil facilities

    The United States announced on Friday it would send military forces to the Gulf following attacks on Saudi oil facilities, hours after Donald Trump ordered new sanctions on Tehran.

  • Virginia Giuffre renews attack against Prince Andrew in first TV interview, saying she's willing to fight in court
    The Telegraph

    Virginia Giuffre renews attack against Prince Andrew in first TV interview, saying she's willing to fight in court

    The woman accusing Prince Andrew of having sex with her as a teenager says she is willing to fight a defamation case to prove her story, as she made the claims on TV for the first time.

  • First look at Line of Duty's Martin Compston in new BBC thriller The Nest
    Digital Spy

    First look at Line of Duty's Martin Compston in new BBC thriller The Nest

    He's filming alongside Peaky Blinders' Sophie Rundle.

  • Geraint Thomas hopes time is right for twin targets
    Evening Standard

    Geraint Thomas hopes time is right for twin targets

    Tour de France runner-up Geraint Thomas will double at the World Championships after being selected for both the individual time trial and the road race when the event starts in Yorkshire next week.Thomas is joined on the TT course by Alex Dowsett and heads up a road race team including Owain Doull, Tao Geoghegan Hart, Ian Stannard, Ben Swift and Adam Yates.

  • Sky News

    Video showing hundreds of shackled, blindfolded prisoners in China is 'genuine'

    Online footage purporting to show hundreds of blindfolded and shackled prisoners in a mostly Muslim region of China is believed to be authentic, a European security source has told Sky News. The detainees are thought to be from China's minority Uighur Muslims, the source said on Friday. Human rights organisations accuse China of holding one million people, mostly ethnic Uighurs, at sprawling detention camps in Xinjiang province - a charge Beijing strongly denies.

  • Sign of the times: The best climate change protest placards as millions take to streets
    Yahoo News UK

    Sign of the times: The best climate change protest placards as millions take to streets

    Climate change protesters, many waving placards, have taken to the streets on a global day of action, including thousands in the UK.Millions of people are taking part in protests in cities across the planet as part of the global “climate strike” day, with rallies taking part in British cities including Glasgow, London and Manchester.Demonstrations, many involving schoolchildren, have also been organised in Birmingham, Bournemouth, Brighton, Cardiff, Edinburgh and Newcastle.Among the imaginative placards being waved were ones claiming: “Won’t somebody listen to the children?”, “We are skipping our lessons to teach you one”, and “We want to die of old age”.There were also protests in Tokyo, Bangladesh, Sydney, Berlin and Senegal, as well as many other locations around thew world.In Belfast, kids took part in a mass “die-in” as part of the protests.

  • Aerial View Captures Scale of Climate Protests in Berlin
    Storyful

    Aerial View Captures Scale of Climate Protests in Berlin

    Tens of thousands of protesters marched in Berlin on Friday, September 20, as part of a global protest to demand greater action on climate change.This aerial footage shows the scale of the Berlin protests.September 20 saw similar events in cities across the world as thousands joined a Global Climate Strike. Students taking the day off school to attend were a prominent feature of the protests, which have been inspired by Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg. Credit: David Croyé via Storyful

  • Eight firms approved to bid for Brexit freight contracts
    PA Media: UK News

    Eight firms approved to bid for Brexit freight contracts

    Transport Secretary Grant Shapps described the group as 'high quality and experienced'.

  • Nigeria closes borders in effort to stem rice smuggling
    RFI

    Nigeria closes borders in effort to stem rice smuggling

    Nigeria now produces more than 4.8 million tons of rice, an increase of 60 percent since 2013, most of the production coming from President Muhammadu Buhari's northern political stronghold.There is a strong political incentive behind the Nigerian leader's decision to pursue this crackdown against rice smuggling, according to Nigerian economist Adedayo Ademuwagun.According to the Lagos-based political risk consultant, Buhari is unfortunately "implementing the policy at an extreme level". "Local rice production is still not enough for Nigeria’s 190 million inhabitants, who spend about a tenth of their food budget on the staple," argues Ademuwagun. The economist's argument is buttressed by skyrocketing prices. A 50kg bag of rice which used to cost 9,000 naira or 22 euros, has jumped to 22,000 naira (50 euros), higher than Nigeria’s minimum monthly wage of 18,000 naira (45 euros). These prices are according to Todowede Baba Oja, director of the popular Badagry market on the Nigeria-Benin border.Prior to this month's border closure, some 3,000 sacks of imported rice were being smuggled into Nigeria every day by motorbike riders, he says. Indications now are that the supply gap created by the border closure has instead created the perfect conditions for a flourishing imported rice black market.“They go after smugglers who can give them bribes,” says Albert Setonji, a tour operator in Badagry.“People are smuggling ammunition under the guise of rice and turkey.“They just collect money thinking it is rice or regular businesses,” Setonji said.The comptroller general of Nigeria’s Customs Service has vowed to keep the borders closed until Nigeria’s neighbours comply with legislation on imported goods. But according to Adedayo Ademuwagun, the “rice policy” which is driving the closure is all about politics. “It is compensation for rice farmers who voted for President Muhammadu Buhari when he was running for re-election in 2019,” insists the political risk consultant based in Lagos.

  • West Ham v Man United: Premier League match preview
    PA Media: Video

    West Ham v Man United: Premier League match preview

    An in-depth match preview ahead of Manchester United's Premier League visit to West Ham. Both sides have had a mixed start to the season, with two wins and eight points from their opening five games.

  • Metropolitan Police ‘suppressed’ report into second false Lord Brittan claim
    The Telegraph

    Metropolitan Police ‘suppressed’ report into second false Lord Brittan claim

    Scotland Yard has been accused of suppressing a second damning report criticising both police and Tom Watson for pursuing a false rape allegation against Lord Brittan.

  • Area 51 raid: Two detained by police as dozens of alien hunters gather to 'storm' secretive military base
    Evening Standard

    Area 51 raid: Two detained by police as dozens of alien hunters gather to 'storm' secretive military base

    At least two alien hunters have been detained at the gate of Area 51 in Nevada.Reports suggested one man was arrested for urinating at the gate of the once-secret military base, while another was detained for trying to go under it.

  • The Telegraph

    CCTV boss in charge of monitoring body of Emiliano Sala encouraged colleague to watch player's post-mortem

    The CCTV boss in charge of monitoring the body of footballer Emiliano Sala encouraged her colleague to watch the player’s post-mortem, texting him: "Nice one for you to watch when you're next in.”

  • Paper tigers: India's big cat surveys 'over reporting numbers'
    The Telegraph

    Paper tigers: India's big cat surveys 'over reporting numbers'

    Surveys of India's tiger population that have cheered conservationists by reporting sharp rises in numbers may have exaggerated, an investigation claims.