• Libby Squire latest updates: Everything we know so far about the missing Hull student
    The Telegraph

    Libby Squire latest updates: Everything we know so far about the missing Hull student

    Forty-nine days after Hull student Libby Squires went missing, pieces of the tragic puzzle finally started to emerge.

  • Death threats and an assault: May told her Brexit attack puts MPs in danger
    PA Ready News UK

    Death threats and an assault: May told her Brexit attack puts MPs in danger

    The PM has been warned her accusation MPs are failing to deliver Brexit will cost her support for her deal in the Commons.

  • Game of Thrones star Emilia Clarke reveals she survived life-threatening stroke
    PA Entertainment

    Game of Thrones star Emilia Clarke reveals she survived life-threatening stroke

    The actress spoke about suffering a subarachnoid haemorrhage as she launched a new charity, SameYou, to support young people with brain injuries.

  • The Color Purple actress dropped from musical over homophobic comments
    The Independent

    The Color Purple actress dropped from musical over homophobic comments

    UPDATE: Seyi Omooba has been dropped from The Color Purple‘s UK revival after she came under fire for an anti-gay post she made in 2014. “Following careful reflection it has been decided that Seyi will no longer be involved with the production.

  • Levee Breach Prompts Evacuations in Atchinson, Kansas
    Storyful

    Levee Breach Prompts Evacuations in Atchinson, Kansas

    Water from the overflowing Missouri River broke through a levee on Thursday, March 21, prompting evacuations in Atchinson, Kansas, emergency officials said. Aerial footage captured by the Kansas Highway Patrol shows the extent of the flooding from the overflowing river. A second clip shows water rushing through a gap in the levee and spilling into the flood plain. Heavy rain and snowmelt swelled rivers and triggered “historic” flooding across the central United States. Tens of thousands of acres of farming were said to be inundated. Police closed highways and advised Atchison residents to boil water due to the flooding’s impact on water treatment facilities. Credit: KHP Air Support Unit via Storyful

  • Donald Tusk reignites attack on Brexit leaders saying: Hell is still empty... there is a lot of space
    Evening Standard

    Donald Tusk reignites attack on Brexit leaders saying: Hell is still empty... there is a lot of space

    Donald Tusk has reignited his previous verbal attack on Brexit leaders, saying there was “a lot of space” in hell for those who promoted the UK-EU split without a plan. The European Council president’s remarks came after seven hours of negotiations on Thursday over whether to grant Britain an extension to Article 50. Mr Tusk was asked about comments he made last month in which he said he had been "wondering what the special place in hell looks like for those who promoted Brexit without even a sketch of a plan with how to carry it out safely".

  • Theresa May acknowledges frustrations of MPs after Brexit speech backlash
    PA Ready News UK

    Theresa May acknowledges frustrations of MPs after Brexit speech backlash

    'There are passionately held views on all sides' the PM said.

  • How the 0.1% give birth: Michelin star dining, three bedroom hospital suites and bespoke getaway cars
    Evening Standard

    How the 0.1% give birth: Michelin star dining, three bedroom hospital suites and bespoke getaway cars

    Royal baby fever is set to hit this spring with Meghan Markle's due date on the horizon. While it hasn't been confirmed where Prince Harry and Megan Markle will have their baby, the Duke and Duchess are likely to go private. From Michelin-starred meals to destination births, here's how the 0.1% give birth around the world.

  • Suspicion and strife strain Ethiopian plane crash probe
    Reuters

    Suspicion and strife strain Ethiopian plane crash probe

    ADDIS ABABA/PARIS (Reuters) - At the headquarters of the Ethiopian Civil Aviation Authority, a paper sign balanced above room 107 and a threadbare square of carpet welcome a stream of foreign visitors to the Accident Investigation Bureau. The office - with three investigators and an annual budget of less than 2.5 million Birr (£66,575) - is leading a multi-party, multi-nation probe into what caused an Ethiopian Airlines flight to crash on March 10, killing all 157 people on board. This modest agency is under intense international scrutiny because the results of its investigation could have far-reaching consequences for the global aviation industry.

  • Wall Street powers world stocks; dollar up on Brexit woes
    Reuters

    Wall Street powers world stocks; dollar up on Brexit woes

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Wall Street led global stocks higher on Thursday on the back of upbeat economic data, while the dollar rallied despite the Federal Reserve's uber-dovish stance as Brexit worries weighed on the euro and sterling.

  • Sky News

    RSPCA discovers 'thinnest dog ever seen alive' in Lancashire

    An emaciated dog which had been eating glass and bits of batteries has been described as the "thinnest dog ever seen alive" by the RSPCA. Eric, a bull breed, was found in the yard of an empty council house in Accrington, Lancashire, by a member of the public. RSPCA inspector Nina Small said Eric "had very overgrown nails and was absolutely covered in urine".

  • Bizarre moment runaway ostrich wanders into traffic on busy A road
    Evening Standard

    Bizarre moment runaway ostrich wanders into traffic on busy A road

    A runaway ostrich sparked chaos on a busy main road and brought rush hour traffic to a standstill today. Drivers on the A12 in Colchester were treated to the bizarre sight of an ostrich wandering between their cars during the evening rush hour. One man managed to usher the bird to the side of the road.

  • Danny DeVito urges fans to vote for Jeremy Corbyn at next general election
    PA Entertainment

    Danny DeVito urges fans to vote for Jeremy Corbyn at next general election

    The actor also endorsed the Labour leader in 2017.

  • Australian TV host criticised for mocking New Zealand PM's accent during moving speech about Christchurch attacks
    The Independent

    Australian TV host criticised for mocking New Zealand PM's accent during moving speech about Christchurch attacks

    An Australian TV host has criticised after he mocked New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern moments after she had given a speech about the Christchurch terror attacks. In a bizarre tweet posted in response to her vow to never say the name of Brenton Tarrant, the man accused of killing 50 people at two mosques on Friday, Sam Newman ridiculed Ms Adern's accent. The former Aussie rules football player's comment was subjected to an almost immediate online backlash.

  • Sky News

    Gucci criticised for selling dirty trainers from £615

    Box fresh trainers might become a thing of the past as Gucci has become the latest high-end fashion brand to sell scruffy footwear. The Italian fashion house sparked debate over its Screener leather sneakers from its Cruise 2019 collection, with critics saying they look "dirty" and accusing the brand of "commercialising poverty". Gucci say the trainers reference "old school shapes and materials inspired by vintage sportswear".

  • Oxford college to investigate its own role in colonialism
    The Guardian

    Oxford college to investigate its own role in colonialism

    Job description for research post refers to recent campaign to remove a statue of Cecil Rhodes from Oriel College. Photograph: Carl Court/Getty ImagesAn Oxford college is to examine its contribution to creating and maintaining Britain’s colonial empire, in a pioneering effort to crowdsource and “decolonialise” its own imperialist past.St John’s College is advertising for a new academic post whose appointee will work on a research project named St John’s and the Colonial Past, alongside Prof William Whyte, the college’s vice-president and professor of social and architectural history at Oxford.The college said the post would be unique within Oxbridge as an effort to investigate its own history, including the education of both apologists and critics of the empire, and hopes it will “set the standard for future work in other institutions”.The job application specifically highlights the recent controversy over the Rhodes Must Fall campaign which began in South Africa and spread to Oxford, due to the financial links between Oriel College and its imperialist benefactor and alumnus Cecil Rhodes. The campaign is calling for the removal of a statue of Rhodes at the college.“The drive to ‘decolonise the university’ or, at any rate, to think through the implications of institutional involvement in the imperial projects of the past – is now a global business,” the college said in announcing the post. “As yet, however, no college in Oxford or Cambridge has seriously undertaken research into its involvement in colonialism.“This project will explore connections between the college and colonialism, uncovering benefactions to St John’s and the alumni who served in the empire. It will also investigate the monuments, objects, pictures, buildings that evoke the colonial past.”The appointment is for a full-time two-year position as a research assistant, with applicants expected to have a doctorate or similar postgraduate qualification.Unusually for an Oxbridge academic post, the job specification says expertise in crowdsourcing is “highly desirable” to feed into reports and workshops on the college’s past, including those alumni who benefited from its colonial links.“Although, unlike the universities of the US, we believe that the colleges of Oxford did not own enslaved people, several undoubtedly benefitted from the largesse of those who did,” the application states.“Many of the objects displayed in university museums and some of those owned by the colleges had their origins essentially as loot, stolen from their indigenous owners.“Oxford in general helped to educate and train colonial administrators; missionaries; apologists for and critics of empire; and significant leaders and creators of newly independent states.”The researcher is expected to investigate the connections between the college and colonialism, including donations to St John’s from the alumni who served in the empire. One result is to be a report on St John’s colonial past, followed by a series of workshops to discuss the findings and plan the college’s responses.The post is to be funded by the college. St John’s is the wealthiest Oxford college measured by endowments, with more than £500m in assets. Its former students include Tony Blair.Last year Oxford’s All Souls College added a memorial plaque commemorating the slaves who worked on plantations in Barbados. The funds from the plantation were left to the college by a former fellow and were used to build the college’s library.

  • Kidnapped German journalist who gave birth in Syria speaks for first time
    The Telegraph

    Kidnapped German journalist who gave birth in Syria speaks for first time

    A German documentary maker who was kidnapped in Syria when she was seven months pregnant and gave birth to a son while being held hostage has spoken out about her ordeal for the first time.

  • Next-Gen Porsche 911 Turbo spied showing its bountiful backside
    motor1

    Next-Gen Porsche 911 Turbo spied showing its bountiful backside

    The design layout at the rear has some noticeable changes versus the new 911 Carrera.

  • Sky News

    'Ostrich' causes traffic chaos after crossing A12 in Essex

    Commuters trying to get home were left in a flap when traffic came to a standstill after a suspected ostrich wandered on to the road. Essex Police attended alongside Highways England staff and located the bird at around 7pm between junctions 27 and 28.

  • Fall in specialist teachers for children with additional needs
    PA Ready News UK

    Fall in specialist teachers for children with additional needs

    The number of additional support needs teachers in Scotland has dropped by 483 since 2010, the Scottish Greens say.

  • Sky News

    Number of parents fined over poor school attendance up 74.7%

    Data from the Department for Education (DfE) shows an increase in the number of penalty notices issued from 149,300 in 2016/17 to 260,877 in 2017/18. The most common reason for a penalty notice was unauthorised family holiday absence, with a total 85.4% issued for that reason in 2017/18 - up from 77.5% the previous year. The DfE put the rise down to changes in regulations, as well as a number of high-profile court cases in the last few years.

  • Tate will no longer take donations from the Sackler Trust following opioid scandal
    The Telegraph

    Tate will no longer take donations from the Sackler Trust following opioid scandal

    Tate will no longer take donations from the Sackler Trust following its opioid scandal, it has been revealed.

  • Reuters

    EU considers options for Brexit delay - May 7, year-end or open-ended, diplomats say

    European Union leaders were considering different options on delaying Brexit on Thursday, possibly until May 7, the end of the year or even leaving the date open for now, diplomatic sources said. The leaders started discussions on delaying Brexit after Prime Minister Theresa May asked to postpone the current exit date of March 29 until the end of June. "This would just give us more time to prepare for a no-deal Brexit," one diplomat said.

  • Little sun bear's facial mimicry reveals complex social skills
    Reuters

    Little sun bear's facial mimicry reveals complex social skills

    Sun bears, the smallest of the world's eight bear species, are generally solitary animals, content to spend most of their time alone outside mating season, foraging for fruit, rodents, birds and insects in Southeast Asian tropical forests. Researchers studied 22 sun bears in spontaneous social play at the Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre in Malaysia in outdoor forest enclosures big enough to let the animals decide whether to interact or avoid each other all day. The bears exactly mimicked facial expressions they saw other bears produce during social play, copying with high precision not only the type of expression but also specific muscular movements such as raising their noses and wrinkling the bridge of their muzzles.