How have the royal family responded to Meghan and Harry’s Oprah interview? Everything we know so far

Independent Staff
·3-min read
<p>The Queen marks Commonwealth Day on 8 March</p> (AP)

The Queen marks Commonwealth Day on 8 March

(AP)

With its revelations about racism, suicidal thoughts and the breakdown of relationships, The Duke and Duchess of Sussex's TV interview has already provoked strong reactions around the world.

The other members of the royal family, however, have so far remained silent - at least in public - about the content of Meghan and Harry's primetime chat with Oprah Winfrey.

Reports over the weekend suggested that the Queen would “ignore” the interview, which was first screened in the US on Sunday night before being repeated on ITV.

On Monday, as the media frenzy began, Elizabeth II officially marked Commonwealth Day in her role as head of the voluntary association of 54 countries, most of which were previously part of the British Empire.

The Royal Family's social media accounts also issued a single message to mark the occasion, accompanied by a photograph of the Queen signing a message to the Commonwealth nations.

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Meanwhile Duke of Edinburgh remained at the private King Edward VII's Hospital in central London, having first been admitted on 17 February for treatment for an infection and a heart condition.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge also marked International Women's Day by releasing footage of Kate's video call with 21-year-old Jasmine Harrison, the youngest woman to solo row the Atlantic.

While Prince Charles's movements are unknown, the Duchess of Cornwall joined a video reception with the Women of the World Festival in London. She is president of the organisation, which hosts international festivals and events to celebrate women and girls across the globe.

The Countess of Wessex had also marked Commonwealth Day and International Women's Day with video calls with three women from around the Commonwealth about their experiences on Sunday.

Prince Andrew stepped back from public duties in November 2019 in the wake of the BBC interview he gave about his ties to billionaire paedophile Jeffrey Epstein. The Duke of York said it had become clear to him in recent days that his association with the late convicted sex offender had become a “major distraction” to the royal family’s work.

In the absence of official comment, royal watchers will instead look out for leaks from “palace sources”, after The Sunday Times reported that royal advisers were said to be “prepared to retaliate with fresh disclosures" about Meghan and Harry's behaviour "if the monarchy is attacked”.

Many other public figures have also been happy to comment, with Foreign Office minister Lord Goldsmith accusing the Duke of Sussex of "blowing up his [own] family"

Boris Johnson has so far dodged questions about the interview, while children's minister Vicky Ford commented: "There's no place for racism in our society and we all need to work together to stop it.

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer said: "The issues that Meghan has raised of racism and mental health are really serious issues. It is a reminder that too many people experience racism in 21st century Britain. We have to take that very, very seriously."

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