Southbank Centre to preview Daniel Day-Lewis’s last movie Phantom Thread

By Francesca Gosling
1 / 4

Southbank Centre to preview Daniel Day-Lewis’s last movie Phantom Thread

The event will also include a first live orchestral performance of the movie’s soundtrack.

London’s Southbank Centre is to host a special preview of Paul Thomas Anderson’s film Phantom Thread, featuring Daniel Day-Lewis’ final professional performance.

The event will also include a first live orchestral performance of the movie’s soundtrack, created by Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood and performed by the London Contemporary Orchestra.

Academy Award winner Day-Lewis plays dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock in the movie set in the 1950s whose work with his sister Cyril (Leslie Manville) becomes disrupted as he becomes embroiled in a relationship with young newcomer Alma (Vicky Krieps).

Greenwood and Anderson will attend the event on January 31 themselves, introducing the film that will officially open in cinemas on February 2.

Commenting on another success with Anderson, following their work on There Will Be Blood, The Master, and Inherent Vice, Greenwood said: “It’s been a great pleasure to work again with Paul Thomas Anderson on his brilliant new film and with my good friends the London Contemporary Orchestra.

“It’s such a special occasion for me to introduce my score for the first time to the Royal Festival Hall audience, a venue which has a great history of presenting both new music and music from films, and the ideal setting to immerse yourself in the world of 1950s post-war London.”

Jonny Greenwood worked on the film’s soundtrack (Yui Mok/PA)

It is understood that Phantom Thread will be Day-Lewis’ last film after he announced his retirement from acting at the age of 60.

He has previously said that his decision came while filming Phantom Thread, telling US fashion magazine W: “Paul and I laughed a lot before we made the movie. And then we stopped laughing because we were both overwhelmed by a sense of sadness. That took us by surprise.

“It’s settled on me, and it’s just there. Not wanting to see the film is connected to the decision I’ve made to stop working as an actor. But it’s not why the sadness came to stay. That happened during the telling of the story, and I don’t really know why.”

Tickets for the preview event will go on sale to Southbank Centre Members on Thursday and to the general public on Friday.