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Strictly star Johannes Radebe’s memoir getting big screen treatment

Johannes Radebe’s memoir ‘JoJo: Finally Home’ is set to receive a film adaptation credit:Bang Showbiz
Johannes Radebe’s memoir ‘JoJo: Finally Home’ is set to receive a film adaptation credit:Bang Showbiz

Johannes Radebe’s memoir ‘JoJo: Finally Home’ is set to be adapted for the big screen.

The 36-year-old 'Strictly Come Dancing' - who has partnered up with the likes of Caroline Quentin, John Whaite and Annabel Croft on the BBC Latin and ballroom show - will see his book about his struggles as a gay dancer in South Africa adapted into a family movie, complete with musical numbers that he has choreographed himself.

Anthony Kimble’s ‘Arrested Industries and Helena Spring Films have acquired the rights the the project, which currently has the working title ‘Finally Home’.

In a statement to Deadline, Johannes said: “Growing up gay in the townships of South Africa was not an easy ride, but there were so many good things about my life there, and it has made me the person I am today.

“I never imagined my story would end up on the big screen, so I am greatly appreciative of this new opportunity and look forward to working closely with Helena and Anthony over the coming months.”

Anthony teased what viewers can expect from the movie and called it a “hugely heartwarming coming-of-age tale”.

He said: “At its core, Jojo’s story is a hugely heartwarming coming-of-age tale, but it also conveys so many interesting themes around identity, acceptance, community and, of course, family.

“Our ambition is to do the book – and Jojo – justice by producing a bold, colorful and thoroughly entertaining film that leaves audiences of all ages with big smiles on their faces.”

Helena added: “South Africa is increasingly becoming a go-to location for international film and TV, with the world recognizing that we not only have a skilled talent base but also so many brilliant stories to tell.

“‘Finally Home’, while clearly an incredible personal story, will also provide insights into contemporary culture in South Africa and portray facets of community life in the townships that are rarely seen on screen.”