The Fifth Estate named biggest flop of 2013

Cheer up... Benedict Cumberbatch and Daniel Brühl in The Fifth Estate (Credit: Rex)

It’s a bad day to be Benedict Cumberbatch.

The actor’s Wikileaks drama ‘The Fifth Estate’ has been named the biggest box office flop of 2013 by financial publication Forbes.

Experts at the money mag calculated that the Bill Condon helmed biopic of hacktivist Julian Assange made just $6 million back from its $28 million budget.

With an Oscar-decorated director, an Über-topical subject, and according to Empire, “the world’s sexiest movie star” Benedict Cumberbatch upfront, ‘The Fifth Estate’ should have been a smash. Instead, it made an embarrassing return of just 21%.

[Cumberbatch: Assange asked me to reconsider WikiLeaks role]


But the film isn’t the only feature with expensive egg on its face, as according to Forbes, movies flaunting some far more established talent all took a beating at the box office.

Second place went to Sly Stallone’s cringe-along action ‘Bullet To The Head’, bringing back 36% of its $25 million budget. Whilst one of the more embarrassing movie moments of the year is awarded to the heavyweight cast of Harrison Ford, Gary Oldman and Liam Hemsworth, whose movie ‘Paranoia’ made just $13.5 million from a $35 million budget. The worst debut of Harrison Ford’s entire Hollywood career.

Here’s the full list of Forbes’ Top Turkeys of 2013:

1 - The Fifth Estate: 21% return
2 - Bullet to the Head: 36% return
3 – Paranoia: 39% return
4 – Parker: 49% return
5 - Broken City: 54% return
6 - Battle of the Year: 55% return
7 – Getaway: 58% return
8 – Peeples: 60% return
9 – RIPD: 60% return
10 - The Big Wedding: 63% return

Was ‘The Fifth Estate’ really that bad? What movies are you surprised aren’t on the list? Let us know in the comments below. You can watch the trailer for "the biggest flop of 2013", here.

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