Irish gymnast debunks 'anti-sex' bed myth at Olympics: 'It's fake news'

·1-min read
Irish gymnast debunks 'anti-sex' bed myth at Olympics: 'It's fake news'
Ireland gymnast Rhys McClenaghan set the record straight on the durability of the beds in the Olympic village. (AP/Twitter)
Team Ireland gymnast Rhys McClenaghan set the record straight on the durability of the beds in the Olympic village. (AP/Twitter)

Recently, a number of Olympic athletes took to social media to crack a joke about the cardboard beds that await them in the Tokyo Olympic village.

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One way or another, some athletes jumped to the conclusion that the reason why the beds were made of cardboard was to prevent athletes from getting intimate during the Games.

As some were making jokes about the sleeping quarters, Ireland gymnast Rhys McClenaghan, while potentially sacrificing himself and his bed frame in the process, set out to test the durability of these beds to prove once and for all if these things really could get in the way of intimate activity… for science, of course.

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McClenaghan’s jumps may not earn him a gold medal, but he seems mighty pleased to know that his bed won’t collapse upon vigorous movement.

The beds are made of “environmentally conscious” products that consist of recyclable cardboard and polyethylene materials. The manufacturer, Airweave, has stated that the units can handle a weight of roughly 200 kilograms, or approximately 441 pounds.

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