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Disney pulls new version of Brave's Princess Merida from its website

Studio was criticised for giving her a 'sexy' new look

Disney appears to have pulled the newly-redesigned Princess Merida from its website, following a wave a public outcry about her new look.

An online petition called for Disney to rethink their new design of the 'Brave' character, after parents, fans of the film and its director criticised the company for giving her a more glamourous appearance than that seen in last year's movie.

[Related story: Brave director slams redesign of Princess Merida]

Before and After... Merida from Brave gets a makeover (Copyright: Disney)

“Numerous supporters have written to us to share the news that the new makeover version of Merida is no longer appearing on Disney.com,” wrote Carolyn Danckaert, who co-founded the online petition, posted on Change.org.

It does indeed appear that the new version of the character is no longer on the site.

Merida had been redesigned to be inducted into the 'Disney Princesses' merchandising range, which includes the likes of Rapunzel, Snow White and Cinderella.

But the new Merida had a thinner waist, and what has been described as a 'Victoria's Secret' hairstyle, causing over 200,000 people to join the campaign, calling for Disney boss Bob Iger to 'keep Merida Brave'.

Merida's new look also cast aside her bow and arrow from the film, making more of her flowing dress and flowing auburn locks.

The film's director, Brenda Chapman, gave the debate further momentum, after she wrote a scathing letter to her local newspapers, the Marin Independent Journal.

“I think it's atrocious what they have done to Merida,” she wrote.“When little girls say they like it because it's more sparkly, that's all fine and good but, subconsciously, they are soaking in the sexy 'come hither' look and the skinny aspect of the new version. It's horrible!

“Merida was created to break that mould - to give young girls a better, stronger role model, a more attainable role model, something of substance, not just a pretty face that waits around for romance.”