Gary Glitter will not receive royalties for 'Joker' soundtrack

Albertina Lloyd
Entertainment reporter, Yahoo UK
Joaquin Phoenix in Joker (Credit: Warner Bros)

Gary Glitter will not be paid for the use of one of his songs in the movie Joker.

British cinema-goers were horrified to discover Todd Phillips’ new film - starring Joaquin Phoenix as the comic book villain -featured Rock and Roll Part 2, by the convicted sex offender.

But Snapper Music and Universal Music Publishing Group, which own the rights to Glitter’s back catalogue, told the LA Times: “Gary Glitter does not get paid – we’ve had no contact with him”.

Read more: Moviegoers horrified at Gary Glitter inclusion on 'Joker' soundtrack

Gary Glitter is serving a 16 year prison sentence for child sex offences (Credit: PA)

Universal Music Publishing Group said: “Gary Glitter’s publishing interest in the copyright of his songs is owned by UMPG and other parties, therefore UMPG does not pay him any royalties or other considerations.”

The song features in a key scene, during which Phoenix's failed comedian Arthur Fleck makes his transformation into his psychotic alter-ego. The song plays for around two minutes as Phoenix walks down a long flight of stairs.

Joaquin Phoenix dances to Gary Glitter's track in Joker (Credit: Warner Bros)

Glitter - real name Paul Gadd - is currently serving a 16-year prison sentence for sexual offences against children. He was convicted in 2015 of attempted rape, four counts of indecent assault, and one of having sex with a girl under the age of 13 and remanded at Wandsworth Prison in the UK.

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The singer was first arrested in 1997 after pornographic images of children were found on a computer he had taken for repair. He was jailed for four months realating to that offence in 1999, and for three years in Vietnam after being convicted of child sex offences in 2006.

Joker has won critical acclaim and smashed estimated box office projections, taking nearly £435 million worldwide in its first two weeks of release.

The film won the Golden Lion prize at the Venice film festival and is hotly tipped for Oscar recognition.