Hugh Grant: I've made some 'shockers'

Ben Arnold
Contributor
Hugh Grant (Credit: Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic)

Hugh Grant has admitted that in the past, he's not always made the best movie choices.

In fact, the Four Weddings and a Funeral star is happy to say that he's made one or two 'shockers' over his career.

Speaking at The Hollywood Reporter's annual Drama Actor Round Table, along with Stephan James, Diego Luna, Sam Rockwell, Richard Madden and Billy Porter, he discussed being type cast in rom-coms.

“I've gotten too old and ugly and fat to do them anymore, so now I've done other things and I've got marginally less self-hatred,” he said.

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“I was being paid tons of money. I was very lucky. And most of those romantic comedies I can look squarely in the face — one or two are shockers, but on the whole I can look them in the face and people like them.

“And I am a big believer that our job is to entertain. It's not to practice some weird, quasi-religious experience. I see us as craftsmen along with the guy who does the lights and the guy who edits and the guy who pushes the dolly. Because if it's not that, I think it's a bit masturbatory.”

He went on to say that he knew some projects were duffers when he signed up for them, notably the 1988 movie Rowing With The Wind.

“When I was unemployed, I took everything. The worse it was, the quicker I took it,” he added. “In fact, quite enjoyed it.

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“You think, 'Oh, well, this is nonsense, this film, it's being made in Spain with English actors, with a director who doesn't speak English and German money, it's never going to see the light of day, so just go and have a nice time for three months, flirt with the actress playing Claire Claremont [Grant's ex, Elizabeth Hurley]. I used to call them Euro Pudding.

“Every decision I ever made was probably wrong. After Four Weddings, and the world was my oyster, I should've made interesting decisions and done different stuff. Instead, I repeated myself almost identically about 17 times in a row.

“I had to wait until all the romantic comedy had dried up before I was offered anything else. People saw all those romantic comedies where I was being a nice guy written by Richard Curtis, who is a very nice guy, and they used to think, 'Oh, Hugh must be like that,' but I'm vile. Really.”

Grant made his screen debut in the 1982 movie Privileged, and featured in films like White Mischief and The Remains of the Day, before making his name in Curtis's Four Weddings and a Funeral in 1994.