New 'secret' Ghostbusters 3 movie on the way from Jason Reitman

Ben Arnold
Contributor
Ghostbusters (Credit: Columbia Pictures)

UPDATE: Sony Pictures has released the first teaser for Jason Reitman’s new Ghostbusters films. Entertainment Weekly has the exclusive first look at the horror comedy, but it’s more of a tease than an actual trailer. Check it out here.

“This is very early, and I want the film to unwrap like a present. We have a lot of wonderful surprises and new characters for the audience to meet,” says Reitman, who co-wrote the screenplay with Monster House and Poltergeist remake filmmaker Gil Kenan.

ORIGINAL STORY: A new Ghostbusters movie is on the way, according to reports, which will be a continuation of the 1984 sequel Ghostbusters 2.

And Sony Pictures has signed up Jason Reitman to direct it – the son of Ivan Reitman, who helmed both the original movies.

Reitman has also co-written the screenplay for the film, which is said to be completely unrelated to the 2016 remake movie made by Paul Feig starring Melissa McCarthy.

Instead it will continue the story from Ghostbusters 2, in which the original line-up of paranormal investigators took on the ancient evil of Vigo the Carpathian.

Jason Reitman (Credit: Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images)

But it’s not known whether this could mean that the original Ghostbusters – Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd and Ernie Hudson (sadly, Harold Ramis passed away in 2014) – could be returning to the fold.

But Murray, Aykroyd, Hudson, Sigourney Weaver, Annie Potts and director Ivan Reitman did all had small cameo roles in the 2016 remake.

Reitman, who has made movies like Up In The Air, Tully and most recently The Front Runner, with Hugh Jackman, is said to be currently screen-testing teenagers for four roles in the film.

According to Variety, Sony was keeping Reitman’s attachment to the project a secret, using the codename ‘Rust City’.

The new movie is set to shoot this summer, with a plotted release date in 2020.

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