Batman: The Movie Director Leslie Martinson Dies Aged 101

Director Leslie H Martinson has died at the age of 101 after a long and celebrated life directing numerous TV shows and films, including beloved sixties treasure ‘Batman: The Movie’.

Martinson’s family announced (via THR) that the prolific director died of natural causes on Saturday 3 September, at his family home in Massachusetts. His funeral will take place on 9 September.

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During his lengthy career, Martinson worked on more than 100 teleivsion shows, including 'The Brady Bunch’, 'Wonder Woman’, 'Different Strokes’ and 'CHiPs’.

He also directed a two-parter for the legendary 'Batman’ TV series starring Adam West in the title role and Burt Ward as Robin. Between the show’s first and second season he directed the big screen spin-off over the course of just 27 days.

Martinson’s impressive resumé also included 'The Roy Rogers Show’, 'The Bionic Woman’, 'Quincy ME’, 'Dallas’, 'Mission Impossible’ and 'Six Million Dollar Man’.

If there was a successful TV series made between the 60s and 70s, chances are Martinson worked on it.

His directing career started in 1953 with an episode of 'City Detective’ and he reitred in 1989 after directing an episode of sci-fi sitcom 'Small Wonder’.

It’s 'Batman: The Movie’ for which he’ll be remembered most fondly. A pop culture oddity, it’s fantastically barmy romp perfectly encapsulating the silly side of the Dark Knight rarely seen in this day and age.

His stars, West, Ward and Catwoman Julie Newmar, will soon reprise their roles for upcoming video short 'Batman: Return of the Caped Crusader’.

Our thoughts go out to Martinson’s wife Connie and the rest of his family.

Picture Credits: 20th Century Fox

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